Tropical Sails Corp Travel Agency | River Cruises | Star Clippers Cruises | 2019 Solar Eclipse Tours

1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer S/V Polynesia

1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer Barefoot Cruises S/V Polynesia

 

1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise  1998 solar eclipse cruise 1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer S/V Polynesia 1998 solar eclipse cruise map

1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise

 

From the Arizona Republic:   Join Windjammer Barefoot Cruises for a cruise to observe a total solar eclipse. Ships will be converging on the French island of Guadeloupe in the Caribbean on Feb. 26 for the eclipse. The Legacy and Fantome depart Antigua on Feb. 22 and rendezvous at St. Barthelemy with the Polynesia departing from St. Maarten Feb. 22. The Mandalay, which is sailing for 14 nights,  will join the ships in Guadeloupe. Passenger capacity per ship ranges from 78 to 126.  Other stops include – Nevis and St. Kitts. Cost: $975 to $1,225, and $1,895 on the Mandalay. Airfare is not included Phone- 800-595-1003

 

 

Windjammer Barefoot Cruises S/V Polynesia 1998 solar eclipse cruise 1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer S/V Polynesia Polynesia

Windjammer Barefoot Cruises S/V Polynesia

February/March, 1998
What I Did On My Winter Vacation 

This, like the August 1990 entry, is sort of a “Blog Prequel”. It was written several years before I actually started this Blog. But it’s a story worth telling and worth reading. So in May 2016 I added it for all to read.

So about two and a half years ago, Rick calls me up and says “How’d you like to go take a Windjammer sailing ship to see a total solar eclipse in 1998?” Seemed like a good idea to me at the time. So I posed the same question to Jenny, eliciting a similar response.

The plan was to fly to Sint Maarten in the Dutch Antilles on Sunday, February 22, board the ship and cruise around the Caribbean. We’d visit an island a day, sailing mostly at night, and on the afternoon of Thursday the 26th, position ourselves between Guadeloupe and Montserrat, dead center in the path of the eclipse. We’d finish up back in Sint Maarten on Saturday the 28th, and stay another couple of days there in a guest house to decompress. READ MORE

 

Windjammer Barefoot Cruises S/V Legacy 1998 solar eclipse cruise 1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer S/V Polynesia SV Legacy poster

Windjammer Barefoot Cruises S/V Legacy

 

 

TSE February 26, 1998, shot with 1200mm lens wth film aboard the S/V Legacy 1998 solar eclipse cruise 1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer S/V Polynesia TSE 1998

February 26, 1998, shot with 1200 mm lens with film on the S/V Legacy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caribbean Eclipse Map 1998 1998 solar eclipse cruise 1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer S/V Polynesia Caribbean Eclipse Map 1998

Map of Antigua Guadeloupe channel where a solar eclipse passed in 1998.

 

 

TSE 1998 by Daniel Oppliger 1998 solar eclipse cruise 1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer S/V Polynesia TSE 1998 B

TSE 1998 by Daniel Oppliger

 

Montserrat Volcano which was erupting during our voyage 1998 solar eclipse cruise 1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer S/V Polynesia Monserrat

Montserrat Volcano which was erupting during our voyage

 

 

Captain Neil Carmichael 1998 solar eclipse cruise 1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer S/V Polynesia Capt Neil

Captain Neil Carmichael

 

 

 

Bill Oppliger iwth Popeye 1998 solar eclipse cruise 1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer S/V Polynesia Dad with Popeye

Bill Oppliger iwth Popeye

 

Fantome 1998 solar eclipse cruise 1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer S/V Polynesia Fantome

The S/V Fantome was part of our flotilla 1998 solar eclipse cruise

Several MAS members and their families shared an adventure of a lifetime, to sail the Caribbean on a four-masted schooner and see a total solar eclipse to boot. We left O’Hare in the “wee hours Sunday 2-22, on to Miami, then Antigua, then a wild taxi ride, reminiscent of Baja, to the “Fantome:, the flagship of the Windjammer fleet. After the “stowaway” party-night, Monday, 2-23, on stormy seas, we set sail to “Amazing Grace” bagpipes and all (tape recorded).

On 2-24, we docked at St. Barths’ harbor. Being a part of France, Carnival was celebrated on fat Tuesday. After the option of snorkeling, diving, a fantastic glass-bottom boat adventure, or just exploring the island at will, we witnessed the island culture imagination in theme and costume parade. On the dock, waiting for the boat back to the Fantome, we observed the most startling green flash of the trip, a brilliant fluorescent, lime-green spark of the setting sun, almost laserlike in its purity. St. Kitts, 2-25, some explored the island towns and the British Brimstone Hill Fortress; others conquered the rain forest in a grueling mountain hike, always optional -scuba or snorkel; culminating the afternoon, gamble on your favorite hermit crab, matching speed and dexterity against tenacity and strength, on a race to the victory circle. The Fantome sailed from St. Kitts in the evening, passing Nevis and Montserrat by morning. On 2-26, our destination was fifteen miles out from between Montserrat and

The Fantome sailed from St. Kitts in the evening, passing Nevis and Montserrat by morning. On 2-26, our destination was fifteen miles out from between Montserrat and Guadeloupe on the eclipse centerline. The Captain (and passengers) decide not observe from Guadeloupe because clouds form above the mountains during the day; they did, Guadeloupe was clouded for totality. At sea, we were surrounded by dozens of ships. Of course, people flew kites from the stern, kites & eclipses? Totality approached and even Captain Casey started to adopt our technical terms, its eerie, the shadows are strange, all the light is wierd. There were Bailey’s Beads and a diamond ring that seemed to last forever, 10 – 15 seconds? Even the cruise people, many several-timers were moved. When the umbra struck, there was not the usual cheer. It was too awe inspiring for the neophytes on board. A light Strato-cumulus cover did obscure some of the corona, but there were still detailed Continued,

Eclipse Cruise continued streamers from the North and South magnetic poles. The flares, the chromosphere, again, almost a laser -like purity of color,pink-red flourescence. On the way out, the diamond ring seemed to last forever, too soon, the photosphere, partial phases, post totality depression. Solar eclipses are always short, this one: 3minutes, 18.26 seconds, for us on the centerline, but those that saw a solar eclipse for the first time are talking Europe in 1999 with the rest of us umbraphiles. To alleviate the PTD, Captain Casey sailed within 3 miles of Montserrat. Originally, he considered the safe distance to be 8 miles, far enough not to be engulfed by the pyroclastic blast or sunk by the 6 – 12 foot tidal wave expected if the “thing went”, a volcanic eruption. Wine and cheese tasting and a costume dance ended the evening. Docked at Nevis, 2-27, ship or island options: tour and explore the island or swim with the local sharks. The last evening we enjoyed the Captain’s Dinner with the usual humor and always bountiful food and drinks. Sailing back to Antigua for our return to reality and civilization almost seemed absurd. For a week our only reality was the sky, the rolling deck of the ship on the ever changing sea, and the island stops, where every day is a Carnival, if one chooses. This is only a fraction of the fun we had: AstronautAstronomer Pinky Nelson was the ship’s expert speaker, detailing his intimate personal experiences on 3 Space Shuttle flights, stuff we never see on TV; The darkest night we ever envisioned, Carina and the Milky Way itself, were like a vast Orion Nebula and a star cluster swathing a major portion of the sky; and, of course, amateur astronomers informed the voyagers about the stars, constellations, their myths, and general astronomy every clear night. Carnival, the green flash, astronaut Nelson, darkest skies, a total eclipse, and an erupting volcano in one vacation. I am sure that all of us would recommend a Windjammer.

This is only a fraction of the fun we had: AstronautAstronomer Pinky Nelson was the ship’s expert speaker, detailing his intimate personal experiences on 3 Space Shuttle flights, stuff we never see on TV; The darkest night we ever envisioned, Carina and the Milky Way itself, were like a vast Orion Nebula and a star cluster swathing a major portion of the sky; and, of course, amateur astronomers informed the voyagers about the stars, constellations, their myths, and general astronomy every clear night. Carnival, the green flash, astronaut Nelson, darkest skies, a total eclipse, and an erupting volcano in one vacation. I am sure that all of us would recommend a Windjammer barefoot cruise to the stalwart adventure seeking soul.

1998 Solar Eclipse Cruise Windjammer S/V Polynesia

 

Leave A Comment